Early colour photographs of the Beatles on tour have been sold for almost £30,000, nearly twice their estimated price. Friday's auction in Stockport, Cheshire, also included dozens of snaps from an amateur photographer who sneaked into the Fab Four's famous 1965 gig at New York's Shea Stadium, which also went for around £30,000.

As reported in January, there aren't many colour photos of the Beatles' first US tour, in 1964: they were still relatively unproven, and colour film was expensive. But Dr Robert Beck, a physicist and inventor who died in 2002, left behind a huge stash of colour snaps, including shots of the band on stage and images from press events and industry parties. The collection of 65 Beatles slides was expected to bring in between £10,000 and £15,000; at Friday's sale, by Omega Auctions, they went for £27,140.

Bidders were even more excited about another collection of Fab Four photographs, these ones in black and white. Marc Weinstein, an amateur photographer, used a homemade press pass to bluff his way past Shea Stadium's security and into the Beatles' backstage area in August 1965. This made him one of the only photographers present at the Beatles' biggest ever show, BBC News reports. "I just blended with everybody there," Weinstein said. "I just acted like I belonged. Anybody in authority, I would look the other way."

Weinstein's 61 shots had a winning bid of £30,680. The lucky Beatles fan is "a South American gentleman currently living in Washington", an auction-house spokesman told the BBC.

This article originally appeared on guardian.co.uk