Mexico’s ZOÉ has been in existence since 1997, winning over audiences with their spacey psychedelic-infused pop rock. With over 2 million tickets sold, a loyal fan base, a documentary on the way, and two Latin Grammys under their belt, the band is due to release Programáton, their fifth studio album, on October 29th (Universal Music). It’s a well produced effort that brings the Mexican quintet’s space-age sound to a new level by seamlessly incorporating pop and rock elements withsonically intriguing synths and keys that serve as the canvas for vocalist Leon Larregui’s vivid lyrics. 

Recently, I got to speak briefly to Angel Mosqueda, ZOÉ’s very reserved bass player, about Programáton, staying current, and that spacey sound. 

I listened to Programáton and it sounds like a concept album from beginning to end, was this your intention? 

Our real concept was just to showcase ZOÉ’s music in 2013. We’ve proved with this album that we make good music and that’s the only reason we play music…to make good music and that’s that.

How did the title of the album Programáton come about? Does it have a specific meaning for all of you? 

It was an idea that León had and it has to do with the way you view life. Almost like an infinite programming of who we are. 

Where was the majority of the album written? 

It was written in phases, there are songs by everyone. They were recorded in various studios. It’s a very long process. People don’t really know the amount of work that goes into making an album.  

How have technological advances helped in the evolution of your music and production in comparison to your first album? 

It always helps. It’s always helpful to have better tools but people need to understand that in the end what matters are the songs. If there are no songs, there is no technology. In our case, we have abided to that and that is why we are here. What we are showing are ZOÉ’s new songs not the technology behind it. It’s just about the 11 new songs and that’s it, with or without technology. 

The sound of the album seems to be more futuristic and spacey, was this intentional? 

It was just what came out of us as a band in 2013. It’s another ZOÉ album. It’s not any more futuristic or anything like that, it’s another album that stays within the quality of music that ZOÉ makes and hopefully people will like it.

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